littlehorrorshop:

William Powell in The Thin Man, 1934

littlehorrorshop:

William Powell in The Thin Man, 1934

Katharine Hepburn, 1933 © Christopher Strong.

killerbeesting:

Ruth Bernhard, Harlem children, 1931

killerbeesting:

Ruth Bernhard, Harlem children, 1931

Marlene Dietrich in Seven Sinners (1940)  

halftheskymovement:

During World War II, approximately 16 million American men left the country to fight, leaving American women to take their jobs at home. Over the course of the war, about 6 million women worked in factories, 3 million joined the Red Cross and nearly 350,000 volunteered for the female branches of the uniformed services. 

See 21 photos of women marching in uniform, building aircraft and more at Huffington Post

fawnvelveteen:

Hedy Lamarr, wearing a ‘peacock dress’ in a promotional photo for the movie ‘Samson and Delilah’ (1949)

tube-radio:

Woman war worker in a woman’s boarding house listening to a murder mystery on the radio.

Washington DC, January 1943.
Author: Esther Bubley.
More of her photos: http://secondat.blogspot.com/2009/06/esther-bubley.html
Worth seeing!

bag-of-dirt:

Soviet POWs in a temporary collection area beg local passers-by for food. During the war, Germany engaged in deliberately genocidal policies towards Soviet POWs. This resulted in some 3.3 to 3.5 million deaths, or about 60% of all Soviet POWs. During Operation Barbarossa, the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, and the subsequent war between the U.S.S.R. and Germany and the Axis partners, millions of Soviet Army prisoners of war were taken. Some of them were arbitrarily executed in the field by the German forces, died under inhumane conditions in German prisoner of war camps and during ruthless death marches from the front lines, or were transported to Nazi concentration camps. Deliberate starvation lead many desperate Soviet POWs to resort to acts of cannibalism. Near Kalinin, Tver Oblast, Russia, Soviet Union. July 1942.