oldadvertising:

Red Cross Shoes by sharkysrevenge on Flickr.

Woman’s Home Companion magazine, June 1940

mermaidmotelxxx:

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz in his army uniform during WWII part 3
mermaidmotelxxx:

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz in his army uniform during WWII part 3
mermaidmotelxxx:

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz in his army uniform during WWII part 3
mermaidmotelxxx:

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz in his army uniform during WWII part 3

mermaidmotelxxx:

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz in his army uniform during WWII part 3

stevenspapen:

Fort VII

Wilrijk, Belgium, April 2014

lars134:

Lieutenant James Stewart in propaganda film ”Winning Your Wings” (1942)
lars134:

Lieutenant James Stewart in propaganda film ”Winning Your Wings” (1942)
lars134:

Lieutenant James Stewart in propaganda film ”Winning Your Wings” (1942)
lars134:

Lieutenant James Stewart in propaganda film ”Winning Your Wings” (1942)

lars134:

Lieutenant James Stewart in propaganda film ”Winning Your Wings” (1942)

houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941
houseofrandom:

The German Army, 1941

thefollyofwar:

This combination of three photographs shows the reaction of a 16-year old German soldier after he was captured by U.S. forces, at an unknown location in Germany, in 1945. (Source)

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

femmefatale-rps:

Poland in WW2: Szare Szeregi, and "Minor Sabotage"

In September 1939, during the German invasion of Poland and after the fall of Warsaw, a young Polish student named Elżbieta Zahorska tore down a German poster. Soon after, she was executed for her act; her death, however, did not discourage others as intended- it inspired an entire new branch of Polish resistance, called minor sabotage.

"On walls around the city, drawings began to appear that would henceforth be known as the symbols of Warsaw’s underground resistance. "Instructions" were passed by word of mouth among Poles- don’t read German publications, don’t go to movie theaters. The acts of "minor sabotage" were meant to make the lives of German occupiers more difficult; to continously show them, through these seemingly small acts that they could not ignore, that Poland lived, that Poland was fighting, that Poland had not yet given up."

Minor sabotage was often carried out by scouting organizations such as Szare Szeregi, as well as on a larger scale: thousands were soon involved in minor sabotage. During two weeks in March and April 1942 when the kotwica symbol was introduced, it was painted all around Warsaw by a 400-strong dedicated team.

adamscoren:

June 1942. Truck driver at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Douglas Dam by thecitysurfer on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
June 1942. Truck driver at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Douglas Dam.
4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Alfred Palmer.

firebombing:

Otto Frank, Anne Frank’s father and the only surviving member of the Frank family, revisiting the attic they spent the war in.